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What is your load out? Your personal essential gear list? (Read 1313 times)
06/11/18 at 23:01:31

paladin8640   Offline
Future Participant

Posts: 21
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There is the required gear list that we’re all supposed to have. I am curious as to what the various paddlers and veterans consider “essential”. The basics not with standing, pfd, water, boat, paddle etc.
 
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Reply #1 - 06/12/18 at 02:25:22

Ozark paddler   Offline
3X MR340 Veteran
Independence Missouri

Posts: 170
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Sun screen, SPF chap stick, Aleve (pain medicine), Excedrin Migraine, sunglasses, bandana, GPS, multi tool, duct tape. My back band and my seat cushion. Those things and my food are about all I carry in the boat.

I've pared down my gear each year to just things I have actually used in every race and thats what I'm down to.
 
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Reply #2 - 06/12/18 at 10:52:34

KY Paddler   Offline
3X MR340 Veteran
Madisonville, KY

Posts: 79
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The question doesn't go far enough.  Supported or Unsupported?
 
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Reply #3 - 06/12/18 at 10:55:27

Dead Last Johnnie O   Offline
6X MR340 Veteran
2X Gritty Fitty Veteran
Race Volunteer
3X Kawnivore Veteran
4X Kawlloween Veteran
See me on land? Tell me
GET BACK IN BOAT!!!
Belton,Mo

Posts: 525
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Ozark paddler wrote on 06/12/18 at 02:25:22:
I've pared down my gear each year to just things I have actually used in every race and thats what I'm down to.


Curious, other than mandatory items, anything you keep onboard that you hope you NEVER use?

DLJ
 

The faster you can go, the less time you'll be in pain-FlyinLow
 Don't stop--West Hansen 
 DEAD LAST > DID NOT FINISH > DID NOT START
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Reply #4 - 06/12/18 at 13:59:21

Meanhorse   Offline
5X MR340 Veteran
Kawlloween Veteran
Ground Crew Veteran

Posts: 93
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I like Ozark paddler list. I replaced the sun glasses and bandanna with a big straw hat though. I think that works supported or not. Oh, bring money.
 
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Reply #5 - 06/12/18 at 17:19:33

Notorious D.A.D.   Offline
3X MR340 Veteran
Wichita KS/Scottsdale AZ

Posts: 211
***
 
Every year my list gets shorter.

In the boat

1. Small tool kit (duct tape, zip ties, multi-tool, 1 wrench that fits every nut on my boat)
2. 8 liters of water/gatorade
3. Enough food to have 50 calories per hour until resupply
4. GPS
5. homemade mileage cheat sheet
6. paddling gloves
8. throw away rain poncho
9. ziplock bag with small sunscreen, band-aids, ibuprofen, chapstick, pepto tablets & one spare set of GPS batteries.


Attached to my PFD or worn.

1. Phone
2. water activated emergency strobe
3. knife
4. keychain led flashlight
5. spot tracker
6. bandana
7. sunglasses
8. hat

Additional stuff at night

A good waterproof flashlight
safety glasses to keep the bugs out of my eyes.

My goal for this year is to keep my total kit under 25 lbs, including 16 pounds of water.

 
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Reply #6 - 06/12/18 at 17:21:19

Notorious D.A.D.   Offline
3X MR340 Veteran
Wichita KS/Scottsdale AZ

Posts: 211
***
 
[/quote]

Curious, other than mandatory items, anything you keep onboard that you hope you NEVER use?

DLJ
[/quote]

First aid kit!

 
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Reply #7 - 06/12/18 at 20:12:14

Ben   Offline
6X MR340 Veteran
Kawlloween Veteran
Gritty Fitty Veteran
Team Boucher & Son
Kansas City

Posts: 25
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It sounds weird, especially for late July, but I actually get a little cold at night, so I like an extra layer.
 
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Reply #8 - 06/12/18 at 21:14:53

Dead Last Johnnie O   Offline
6X MR340 Veteran
2X Gritty Fitty Veteran
Race Volunteer
3X Kawnivore Veteran
4X Kawlloween Veteran
See me on land? Tell me
GET BACK IN BOAT!!!
Belton,Mo

Posts: 525
******
 
Ben wrote on 06/12/18 at 20:12:14:
It sounds weird, especially for late July, but I actually get a little cold at night, so I like an extra layer.


NOT WEIRD!!! After all the energy spent during the day you WILL cool off at night especially the late night/early morning hours. More than one person has come into an early morning checkpoint shivering. If possible, put on a fresh dry set of clothes plus an extra layer for night time paddling.

DLJ
 

The faster you can go, the less time you'll be in pain-FlyinLow
 Don't stop--West Hansen 
 DEAD LAST > DID NOT FINISH > DID NOT START
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Reply #9 - 06/13/18 at 07:04:22

KY Paddler   Offline
3X MR340 Veteran
Madisonville, KY

Posts: 79
***
 
Notorious,
Wow!  I just calculated weight and came up with approximately 45 pounds.  Now, that’s unsupported, but still . . . .   Will assemble everything this weekend, weigh, and take a serious look at thinning the load.  I had 11 pounds just for my sleep kit!
 
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Reply #10 - 06/13/18 at 07:48:59

paladin8640   Offline
Future Participant

Posts: 21
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It’s hard taking a look at my gear all laid out and trying to justify not taking a piece of equipment.
 
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Reply #11 - 06/13/18 at 11:37:56

Notorious D.A.D.   Offline
3X MR340 Veteran
Wichita KS/Scottsdale AZ

Posts: 211
***
 
KY Paddler wrote on 06/13/18 at 07:04:22:
Notorious,
Wow!  I just calculated weight and came up with approximately 45 pounds.  Now, that’s unsupported, but still . . . .   Will assemble everything this weekend, weigh, and take a serious look at thinning the load.  I had 11 pounds just for my sleep kit!


My first year I was unsupported and I was carrying probably about 45-50 pounds of stuff as well.  Last year I was unsupported for the first 30 hours and my kit was probably less than 1/2 that.

It's different for everybody and the tenancy is to err on the side of caution and throw in stuff that you "might" need.  Especially if you're unsupported. Some of it you just don't know until you've done it a time or two.   I won't tell you that just because I don't bring something you definitely don't need it either, but I would encourage you to eliminate stuff if the potential for needing it is remote or if you can make one item do double duty.

Some examples;

Year one I had a backup hat in case I lost mine in the river or if I just wanted a boonie hat vs a baseball cap- really?  That was just silly. I wear a bandana around my neck for soaking in the river to cool off and if I lose my hat, I'll just go gangsta and wear it as a doo rag.

Year one I carried a 4x6 blue tarp thinking I could sleep under it if I got caught in a storm.  It weighed probably a couple of pounds and I ditched it at Jeff city, still in the wrapper.  This year I picked up one of those super thin throw away rain ponchos at walmart that weighs about 4 oz and if I get stuck I can gut it out with that and a survival blanket.

I wear a vest pfd instead of an inflatable because I like having pockets, but I also use it as a pillow at night.  The rest of my sleep kit is a thermarest backpacking mat that weighs less than a pound, a beach towel and a mylar blanket.  Not as comfy as a sleeping bag but the kit is around 3 lbs vs. 5 pounds or so for just a sleeping bag.  I was cold and miserable on night one last year, but I was cold and miserable for about 2 hours of sleep vs. having to lug a sleeping bag the other 22 hours of the day for no good reason.

Also, I don't carry extra tow rope or rudder cable.  I have a perimeter lifeline on the boat that I can use for either of those if the need arises.

I went over the whole boat thinking it through and tweaking the hardware etc enough that I'm confident that one small multi tool and one small wrench is enough to work on anything that might be a show stopper if it broke.  The only other things in my tool kit are about 6 feet of duct tape and a half dozen zip ties.  I could conceivably break the boat to a point that I couldn't fix it with that stuff, but the chances are remote and I'm willing to take that risk rather than carrying a roll of gorilla tape for example, which weighs over a pound all by itself.

My first year, I carried enough food to have a couple hundred calories an hour for the entire race.  I ended up not eating 1/2 of it.  Bought a couple of hamburgers and a snow cone at checkpoints along the way and found out that if you're stopping anyway, a few bucks to buy food is a lot easier to carry than an extra can of ravioli.  Last year, I calculated 100 calories an hour and still packed too much.  This year I'm figuring 50 calories an hour because that's all my body seems to be able to handle.

I could go on and on, but what it all boils down to is that if you're thinking of taking something along, you have to weigh the pain of carrying it 340 miles vs the potential of it being required or a luxury that you can't live without.

Hope this helps!
 
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Reply #12 - 06/13/18 at 14:05:21

Dead Last Johnnie O   Offline
6X MR340 Veteran
2X Gritty Fitty Veteran
Race Volunteer
3X Kawnivore Veteran
4X Kawlloween Veteran
See me on land? Tell me
GET BACK IN BOAT!!!
Belton,Mo

Posts: 525
******
 
Backpacking 101 !
 

The faster you can go, the less time you'll be in pain-FlyinLow
 Don't stop--West Hansen 
 DEAD LAST > DID NOT FINISH > DID NOT START
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Reply #13 - 06/13/18 at 15:15:20

Notorious D.A.D.   Offline
3X MR340 Veteran
Wichita KS/Scottsdale AZ

Posts: 211
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I thought about it and wanted to clarify my comment on how many calories I consume. 

This is one of those things that you just have to try it so that you understand how your body works in this particular environment, because it will likely be different for everybody.

I'm planning for 50 calories per hour because after doing this a couple of times now I know that's about all I can force myself to eat and as long as I keep up that schedule of regular small snacks and supplement it with a cheeseburger or whatever at stops, I do ok.  You have to find what works for you.

Lots of people do the whole race on weird sport drinks or goos or whatever, but if you try that stuff, make sure you try it during training to make sure it doesn't cause you "distress" during the race.  Personally, I like real food with some goo gels and energy beans mixed in every so often. 




 
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Reply #14 - 06/14/18 at 06:47:39

Ozark paddler   Offline
3X MR340 Veteran
Independence Missouri

Posts: 170
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Lol, don't ever carry a full roll of duct tape/gorrila tape. Save the stub rolls (the last several feet at the end of a roll) and take that. You'll never use more than a couple feet (even it you punch a hole in your boat). I hang my roll from the cross bar directly in front of my seat with a piece of half inch two sided Velcro. That keeps it up out of the bottom of the boat and dry and also in easy reach. Duct tape makes great bandages for your hands by the way.

DLJ, like I said I've gotten rid of everything I don't use, that pretty much includes the stuff I was carrying but hoping not to use. I used to carry imodium and Pepto but I've never been sick during a race so I got rid of them ----- well, ground crew will have them but I quit carrying them around in the boat. Those were things I hoped I would never use though.

John R   Wink
 
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Reply #15 - 06/14/18 at 07:15:14

Ozark paddler   Offline
3X MR340 Veteran
Independence Missouri

Posts: 170
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I look a just about everything that is not a required item and say "can I possibly get along without it for the next 4 or 5 hours until I meet my ground crew again - if the answer is yes then I leave it with them. There is almost nothing, except food and water that I can't make it for a few hours without. Most of the time you'll find that you never really needed whatever it was anyway. I can't really remember a time that I was out on the river and said "oh man, I really wish I had ---that---, why didn't I bring it. Usually if I know that the GC has something or they can get it then I'm satisfied that I can have it eventually and I won't need it in the boat.
Just the way I roll but - seems to work.

John Wink
 
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Reply #16 - 06/17/18 at 18:20:52

ropeswingfail   Offline
MR340 Veteran
Nixa, MO

Posts: 9
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as far as the gorilla tape goes, I have a few layers around my "gatorade" bottle. A few layers of electrical tape as well.
 
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Reply #17 - 06/18/18 at 10:53:32

Kellygj   Offline
3X MR340 Veteran

Posts: 11
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The one thing I wish I had last year was mosquito netting to keep the bugs out of my eyes that were so thick last year. The mention of safety glasses for this purpose is a great idea since it was before dawn and my sunglasses were too dark to wear.
 
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Reply #18 - 06/27/18 at 07:24:43

KY Paddler   Offline
3X MR340 Veteran
Madisonville, KY

Posts: 79
***
 
Started assembling and weighing gear, food, "liquid food", and water.  I'm now at around 24.5 lbs.  This includes 8.5 lbs water and 9 lbs of solid and liquid food. Front deck bag w/ first aid, Android w/ Propaddler and Charger is about 3 lbs.  Sleep gear is right at 4 lbs.

The 24.5 lbs. does not include things worn, such as clothing, PFD, water shoes, hat, or paddle, knife, etc.

Food drop bag for Jeff City is 5.5 lbs.

Notorious, thanks for the inspiration.
 
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Reply #19 - 06/27/18 at 19:09:45

Notorious D.A.D.   Offline
3X MR340 Veteran
Wichita KS/Scottsdale AZ

Posts: 211
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you're welcome.  I only ask that you don't use your new powers for evil (i.e. being faster than me).
 
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