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Is a USCA-reg C1 marathon boat practical? (first timer) (Read 662 times)
01/07/18 at 22:29:18

ChrisD   Offline
Future Participant
Bangor, ME

Posts: 7
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I'm doing the race for the first time this year, and like lots of other newbies I'm not sure which boat. My longest/fastest boat is a Wenonah J-200 C1, an older model 18'6" flatwater racing boat. To me, it seems like it would be quite at home on a long stretch of flatwater/quickwater like the MO. However, looking at results, pictures, videos, etc (what else do 340 wannabees do in winter?), it seems like there are not many C1's, and the ones I do see are either Advantages, Voyagers or those Texas unlimited Spencer jobs. I find the J-200 stable enough, and I don't feel like I'm going to fall out of it if I'm eating lunch, taking off a jacket, etc. Of course, that's when I'm wide awake. So anyway, before I do something unusual I thought I'd ask if it's unusual because it's dumb.

The other boat I'm thinking about is a Wenonah C1W, a downriver racer similar to the Advantage but with more freeboard. I would have way less barge anxiety in that boat, but it's two feet shorter, a bit heavier, and more affected by wind. I'm pretty much a single stick canoe guy, so whatever I race will be some kind of C1.

Thanks for any advice, especially from anyone who has done the race in a USCA spec C1 or decided against it. There's a lot of great info in here! I was just thinking about lights, and boom, there's a topic on lights...
 
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Reply #1 - 01/08/18 at 07:02:10

MurKee Water   Offline
3X MR340 Veteran
MR340 Safety Boat Pilot

Posts: 800
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Here is a discussion you may appreciate.....

http://www.rivermiles.com/forum/YaBB.pl?num=1325726794

 
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Reply #2 - 01/08/18 at 08:39:10

MurKee Water   Offline
3X MR340 Veteran
MR340 Safety Boat Pilot

Posts: 800
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It appears to me that fewer "true" solo canoes are racing, most have rudders added. To me the perfect C1 might be a Blackwater, similar lines to a Voyager but lower bow and stern  height. Wind is a big deal on the river. I had a Magic and loved it but when really paddling hard I could only get 3-4 strokes per side before switching. I did the Freedom Race in my Magic and after 9 hours began to see the attraction of a rudder. Rocky Caldwell, C1Paddler on the forum races a competition boat and he could give you a good answer.
 
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Reply #3 - 01/08/18 at 09:07:42

MurKee Water   Offline
3X MR340 Veteran
MR340 Safety Boat Pilot

Posts: 800
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You could race it in the Shootout in April, that would give you a good feel. Several have raced competition C1's in the Gutbuster, but its on Perche Creek not the river.
 
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Reply #4 - 01/08/18 at 10:37:38

FlyinLow   Offline
3X MR340 Veteran
Kawlloween Veteran
"Life is Entered Upon
with Courage"- A de T

Posts: 234
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I completed the 2013 MR340 in a C1W in 64 hours with 12 hours of bank time.  You'll want to make sure you have a cover for it as the wind can catch it and create some drag.  I installed a rudder on the back with foot controls as well.  I switched between single and double blade. I was .5 MPH faster with the double.  You can cut the sides down if you think they are too tall.  It was a good, stable boat...except for the time a 2072 John Boat purposefully made me dump.   Angry
 

"Don't think you're on the right road just because it’s a well-beaten path."  ~Author Unknown
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Reply #5 - 01/08/18 at 21:31:02

ChrisD   Offline
Future Participant
Bangor, ME

Posts: 7
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MurKee Water wrote on 01/08/18 at 09:07:42:
You could race it in the Shootout in April, that would give you a good feel. Several have raced competition C1's in the Gutbuster, but its on Perche Creek not the river.

Thanks for the info! You're right, that continuum thread is great. It sounds like a USCA C1 would be less comfortable and less seaworthy than an Advantage/C1W/Voyager/etc without being really fast enough to justify that pain/risk. I haven't tried to compare the long duration cruising speeds of the two boats, but they might not be all that different. And if I had to lower the seat in the J-200 to make it work for sleepy paddling, that would have a cost in terms of single blade efficiency.

I'm going to do some speed comparisons when the ice melts, but I'm starting to think the C1W would be a better boat, especially for a first timer. I can work on the engine.

I live far away (Maine), so I probably won't be doing any other nearby races. I'm making a pilgrimage to the midwest to do the 340, eat some BBQ and visit some relatives.
 
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Reply #6 - 01/08/18 at 21:44:34

ChrisD   Offline
Future Participant
Bangor, ME

Posts: 7
*
 
FlyinLow wrote on 01/08/18 at 10:37:38:
I completed the 2013 MR340 in a C1W in 64 hours with 12 hours of bank time.  You'll want to make sure you have a cover for it as the wind can catch it and create some drag.  I installed a rudder on the back with foot controls as well.  I switched between single and double blade. I was .5 MPH faster with the double.  You can cut the sides down if you think they are too tall.  It was a good, stable boat...except for the time a 2072 John Boat purposefully made me dump.   Angry


That's good to hear. I haven't set a goal in terms of time, but it's good to know that a civilized thursday night finish is possible in that boat. I'd rather not cut the sides down, since I still use the boat for whitewater, but I'll definitely do something about a cover or deck if I use it.

Sucks about rogue john boats. I thought asian carp were the main hazard...

I totally dig your spreadsheet. That's going to be on a card in my boat somewhere.
 
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