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Question for Veterans from a first time participant. (Read 441 times)
01/07/18 at 17:57:23

paladin8640   Offline
Future Participant

Posts: 16
*
 
Over the last year I have been haunting the forum and learning everything I can about the 340 and have been blessed by the quality of great information and I thank all of you for sharing.
My question to you is what have you done to make yourself more efficient on the water? I don'the mean just working out and putting in long days on the water, but making your paddling more efficient.

As an example some of things that I have learned are;
That good technique accounts for 40% percent of your paddling potential - Ian Ferguson, Olympic Gold Medalist

Every 25 lbs dropped from your boat increases paddling efficiency by 4.4% - paddlinglight.Com

Dehydration by 2% can impair the body, by 5% can decrease the bodies capacity to work by up to 30%. Reducton in blood volume, increased muscle glycogen use, and increase core temperature. - Sports Nutrition 2nd Edition.

These are some of the examples i've come across and have been thinking about. I apologize for any writing snafus (sent from my tablet) and that I haven't cited all references properly. (My wife is a college professor so....)

Thank you again for your insight
 
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Reply #1 - 01/07/18 at 18:28:20

Jaybee   Offline
2X MR340 Veteran
Knoxville, TN

Posts: 369
**
 
It sounds like you already know what any 'veterans' may know - and it's just a matter of practicing and getting comfortable with what you have learned.

For myself, I made my best paddling advances starting last Summer by paddling in weekly sprint races.  I'm a distance guy and always trained for distance by steady paddling with some sprints involved.  But when I got into some serious sprint races I was amazed at how much it helped my distance paddling.

Not a paddle technique thing but for a race like the MR, I will add that another way to be most efficient is to test everything.  And I mean everything.   Putting on a new pair of sunglasses that pinch your nose just a bit too tightly is an annoyance .... Until you paddle past Miami and the pain on your nose starts to take you out of the race.  Test your boat as it will be fully rigged for the MR to make sure you can reach what you need and that it's balanced as best it can be fore and aft. Only carry what you need between each checkpoint stop.  Stuff like that.
 

Jim
Boat # 3489
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Reply #2 - 01/07/18 at 18:42:33

paladin8640   Offline
Future Participant

Posts: 16
*
 
I appreciate that. I'll be testing everything ad-nauseum and will look into sprints. The sunglasses, that has never crossed my mind and makes perfect since
 
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Reply #3 - 01/07/18 at 19:36:38

Notorious D.A.D.   Offline
2X MR340 Veteran
Wichita KS/Scottsdale AZ

Posts: 167
**
 
The best advice I got was to sign up for the Freedom race and the Shootout.  I had never been on the Missouri river before and doing those races helped my confidence a ton. 

I don't know where you're located, but if schedule and logistics allow, I would highly recommend them. 

The Shootout is basically the first leg of the 340. The Freedom race starts on the Lamine river and ends at Jeff City.  By the time I had done those two races, I had a little bit more idea what the river was like, how the buoys and channel markers worked, what it was like to meet a barge on the river, and most importantly, if I was on the right track with what I had in the boat and where everything was stowed.

 
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Reply #4 - 01/07/18 at 20:59:54

MurKee Water   Offline
3X MR340 Veteran
MR340 Safety Boat Pilot

Posts: 700
***
 
I feel that one large component is mental prep. Most writings are on comparatively short races. This is mentally taxing for many people. This also depends on the type of boat you are paddling. If you going in a ski and can cruise at 10-11mph than you have more freedom to sleep as opposed to a short kayak, plastic canoe or my favorite an aluminum canoe where 6-7mph is pretty good. So know what you are realistically capable of and be prepared for being more tired, hot, chaffed, sunburned, blistered, bored, afraid, distracted and delirious than you possibly have ever been before. It's also a blast, you will probably have one of the best most memorable experiences you ever will have. Which is why this year will be my 4th. Welcome to the club.
 
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Reply #5 - 01/07/18 at 21:49:08

Dead Last Johnnie O   Offline
5X MR340 Veteran
2X Gritty Fitty Veteran
Race Volunteer
3X Kawnivore Veteran
4X Kawlloween Veteran
See me on land? Tell me
GET BACK IN BOAT!!!
Belton,Mo

Posts: 505
*****
 
MurKee Water wrote on 01/07/18 at 20:59:54:
If you going in a ski and can cruise at 10-11mph than you have more freedom to sleep as opposed to a short kayak, plastic canoe or my favorite an aluminum canoe where 6-7mph is pretty good.


There is a a downside to a faster boat. When you start reaching the higher speeds you really start thinking about finishing times. This means you start doing things to get your time lowered even more.The first item that is jettisoned is SLEEP. This is the reason a paddler needs some good shakedown races to learn the speed of his/her setup and plan accordingly.

DLJ

Fred- Of course if you are as delusional as my human none of this matters.  Wink
 

The faster you can go, the less time you'll be in pain-FlyinLow
 Don't stop--West Hansen 
 DEAD LAST > DID NOT FINISH > DID NOT START
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Reply #6 - 01/08/18 at 21:11:25

SkiBumJoe   Offline
2X MR340 Veteran
Race Volunteer
Kawnivore Veteran
Ballwin, MO

Posts: 509
**
 
Regarding efficiency, if you are a double-blader and have not yet used a wing paddle, you should.   Single or double blade, work on your form. I video record my session in the boat. The camera also records speed and distance. The gps records speed, distance and heart rate.  I face a mirror while training on the ergometer at home. I use a smart watch to track overall strokes count. A stop watch helps me track strokes per minute with a 10-second sample.

Stroke technique goes a long way. Plenty of videos on YouTube to learn from. I can recommend some of my favorites.

Check out this thread by Wayfarer:
tips on training for ultra marathon races
http://www.rivermiles.com/forum/YaBB.pl?num=1171759973

Carter Johnson wrote the articles at Fit2Paddle.com



 
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Reply #7 - 01/09/18 at 11:27:05

jtwillman   Offline
4X MR340 Veteran
st charles

Posts: 35
****
 
Do a long day 120 miles or so a month before the race.  That will have you paddling in the dark as well as the light.  Take care of your bottom.  The person who said to test run everything was right.  That means test out the skivvies you will wear and your seat pad (if any) too.  Practice.  Realize that if you are wet, everything will change including location of blisters.  Do not wait to put on sunscreen or to adjust a water valve that is not working up to what it should.  But as you get tired, don't give yourself too many excuses to stop paddling for a minute or two.  Pace yourself.

 
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Reply #8 - 01/09/18 at 21:13:06

DeniseD   Offline
3X MR340 Veteran
4X Ground Crew Veteran
St. Louis

Posts: 97
***
 
Agree about practicing everything while your clothes are wet. Completely changes some things.!!!
 
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Reply #9 - 01/12/18 at 20:26:24

Rusty Coons   Offline
5X MR340 Veteran
Gritty Fitty Veteran

Posts: 185
*****
 
I agree with Murkee, there is a lot of mental toughness that goes into this race.  If you are in relatively good shape your body can complete this race barring injury.  A lot of people bow out of the race because of the mental aspect of the race. If you run this race there WILL be a time you contemplate quitting. I have seen many people say NEVER quit on the water.  Hit the bank give it 30min-1hr and then decide. 
Something I haven't seen answered here yet is mental toughness pertaining to Tandems or teams.  It is imperative to get on the same page as your partner. You also have to know your partner well enough to handle any issues that come up.  I've been blessed with a couple of great partners so I haven't dealt with many issues.  One of the things we discussed before the race was to never speak the word quit. It's also important to keep negativity out of the boat. When things aren't going well or you have an ache that is nagging keep it to yourself. Focus on your technique keep on top of your intake and most of those issues will sort themselves out.

I realize the original question is " what have you done to become more efficient?" So my answer is simple I have tried harder.
Rusty Coons
Boat 3737
 
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