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New here and have C1 sizing question. (Read 1522 times)
07/08/17 at 08:48:28

LRRP   Offline
Future Participant

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Hello,

I'm from Michigan, rookie at paddling and currently own a Crozier J201 C1.  I fluctuate between 195lbs and 205lbs athletic build. 

I find I tip over easily.  In my research I have read how tippy the J201 can be, however I wonder if I'm too large for the canoe.  Or am I just getting too frustrated too early.  This is my second year and last year I didn't have much time to paddle.  I find I make less time for paddling because I get frustrated. 

So I guess the advice I am looking for is;
1.  Do I get a C1 that is more suitable for my size? Is the J201 too small for me?
2.  Or do I put down my pacifier quit whining and put in the time to learn this canoe?   Meaning it's an ok size for me. 

If I am missing any information that may be helpful let me know.  And thanks in advance to anyone that has any input.
 
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Reply #1 - 07/08/17 at 09:04:36

C1Paddler   Offline
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Reply #2 - 07/09/17 at 12:02:50

starbor   Offline
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361-277-1214
victoria texas

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if the wings are not in the water your ok. lower the seat and that will fix the stability problem.
 

361-277-1214
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Reply #3 - 01/15/18 at 08:53:55

HarpHype   Offline
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Tampa, Florida

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starbor wrote on 07/09/17 at 12:02:50:
if the wings are not in the water your ok. lower the seat and that will fix the stability problem.

Thanks for the tip. I'll be keeping this in mind as well.
 

Fishing Novice and Photographer at Petstreetmall.
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Reply #4 - 01/16/19 at 17:06:43

Marcus   Offline
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Orange County, CA

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I have a Crozier J200, very similar to your 201. Im 190lbs and close to/over 200 with some gear. Im near the upper end of what the boat wants, but not over loaded.

After capsizing 2 times in 2 races in my J200, I was frustrated with the stability cliff and cut my seat down 2". the made a Huuuuuuuuge difference in stability.

With the seat at ~7" stock height, the primary stability felt very twichy. Secondary was very good as the wing went in the water, but then when you were .0001 past the point of final stability, the boat just fell out from under me.

With the seat 2" lower, primary stability feels like a Jensen 18 (rock solid), secondary is rock solid, and after you pass the Point of Final Stability (PFS) you have a split second to brace and save yourself before swimming. In fact, taking any bouy turn I keep the boat leaned to final stability the whole time, often passing the PFS and just using a split second brace or draw stroke to keep me upright.

After lowering the seat, I was surfing waves in long island sound that would bury the bow at times, so I was out in 15-20mph winds, 18"+ waves if that says anything about the stability.


Now, even with a lower seat, you WILL swim if you cannot brace instinctively in a J boat. If you want to truly get good in this style of boat, you need to spend many hours practicing 1. edging the boat effectively 2. learning where your PFS is and 3. how to put in a strong brace without thinking about it (and 4. how to do a Capistrano flip and re-entry when your brace fails).

Initially you will have to think about bracing and all this, but if you force yourself to do it 1000 times, you will develop a feel of how far you can safely lean, and when you go too far, throw down a lightning fast brace.
If you have a good brace and a lowered seat, I've gotten through some really really hairy waves in that boat. many an experienced racer thought I was a goner only to be saved by an epic brace.

C1 paddling in general is very skill intensive. The 'J boats' are the Ferrari of C1's and require proportionally more skill to master than a rec C1. If you dont paddle much, it will be hard to master this boat. It really demands a summer of paddling 2-5 times a week to get the basic skills down. After you have them its like riding a bike. So i'd highly recommend paddling a minimum of 3 times a week for 2-6 months this summer.

Also, being in Michigan and having many experienced AuSable paddlers around you, I'd try to meet up with them and learn. I learned everything I know from the Minneapolis canoe racing group and all were extremely helpful mentors.

Last, I would not sell a Crozier. Ever. Everett probably wont make many more boats (hes getting old) and his canoes have some of the finest craftsmanship of any composite boat.  I know the 201 and 202 were short lived designs (with the 203 existing for a while now) so they may have had some design quirks I'm not aware of. If experienced guys tell you you can do better than the 201, maaaaaybe trade it in for a 203 or a Savage River DIII, a very fine solo as well.


Best of luck with it!

 
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