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a question for the tandem veteran racers (Read 3779 times)
01/23/12 at 15:53:25

Rusty Coons   Offline
5X MR340 Veteran
Gritty Fitty Veteran

Posts: 173
*****
 
I am looking for any tips for racing tandem, especially from those with DNFs. What would you do different to finish/ finish faster? how do you motivate your partner when they are near their breaking point?I don't think my partner will ever wanna quit but what do you do if it happens? Can the bow paddler be slightly heavier than the stern paddler? If you are unsupported do you carry all your food or is there venders at the checkpoints? I know these are rambling questions but they have been rolling through my head and i'd like to put them to rest.
Thanks in advance for any info
Rusty
 
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Reply #1 - 01/23/12 at 15:59:40

Paddle-Up   Offline
Future Participant
Dedicated to those who,
"Serve & Protect."!
Riverside, MO

Posts: 221
*
 
My theory is:  If I do nothing but sit in the canoe, I will be done in 110 hrs.  The only way I will quit is an injury.  Period.
The worst I that could happen is if I don't finish in the alloted time, but hell or high water, I will finish.

About who is heavier;  what I have read is keep the canoe balanced.  Move gear forward or backward to adjust the load.

This is strickly my opinion.  As you can see, I have not completed anything like this in my life.
I am 59 years old and my bucket is still full.

Good luck

Oh, and judging by the character of the people associated with the MR340, you are in excellent hands.  Trust and have faith.  (In yourself and your partner)
 

Terry:  "In war, there are no unwounded soldiers." -Jose Narosky.  Wink
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Reply #2 - 01/23/12 at 18:18:56

chuck and di   Offline
12X MR340 Veteran
Kawlloween Veteran
5X Gritty Fitty Veteran
MR340 Record Holder
Kawnivore Record Holder
Kawnivore Veteran
Gritty Fitty Record Holder

Posts: 1302
************
 
As a male in an often mixed tandem the #1 secret I have to offer is keep your mouth shut!
 

If you find yourself suddenly smack dab in the middle of hell, stopping is not an option.
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Reply #3 - 01/23/12 at 18:30:15

brian and marilyn   Offline
6X MR340 Veteran
Kawnivore Safety Boat Pilot
Kawnivore Veteran
Eldon MO

Posts: 319
******
 
And for that very reason I am a solo paddler.

Makes for a more harmonious home life.  Well put Chuck.
 
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Reply #4 - 01/23/12 at 20:38:00

Rusty Coons   Offline
5X MR340 Veteran
Gritty Fitty Veteran

Posts: 173
*****
 
My race partner is my oldest brother so at least I don't have to worry about my actual home life although I would like to keep a good relationship with him as well. I am sure that keeping your mouth shut is good advice in any tandem setting!
 
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Reply #5 - 01/23/12 at 21:05:49

lavollmar   Offline
5X MR340 Veteran

Posts: 25
*****
 
My brother and I have been partners in this race 3 times and are planning to be here again this year.  There is no deep dark secret about keeping peace in a tandem canoe during a very stressful and tough race.  Keeping your mouth shut is good advice but being open to your partner's feelings and opinions is also important.  I consider it a give and take situation too.  We agreed to drop out if the other partner is absolutely unwilling to go on or if an injury has occurred.  We avoid all belittling, petty arguments, and rude comments.  I cannot think of one time that my partner said an unkind word to me even when I was most crabby.     Normally under stress and fatigue, tempers tend to flare and it is easy to snap at each other.  That just uses energy that should be directed to paddling!  If any anger shows, it is usually from me but it is short lived and no grudges are held.  If my partner is tired or cold and wants an hour's rest, then that is what we do.  This is not rocket science.  Granted we are usually at the back of the pack, but so what!  We are not killing each other and we actually kind of enjoy the race for what it has to offer.  Everyone has their own way of making things work.  For us we find this system to work best for us.  Also, don't forget that a nice word or two directed at your partner and your ground crew goes a long way. Good luck with the race!

Linda
 
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Reply #6 - 01/23/12 at 21:59:07

Mark Bramer   Offline
3X MR340 Veteran
Sanity checked at the
door
Maryland Heights, MO

Posts: 273
***
 
Rusty, as far as weight differential between partners, search the forum for threads with the words "plow" and "trim" (make sure you search all historic threads rather than just the last week).  There are a few helpful threads that will give you guidance.

As for motivating your partner, you might consider taking the stern position and carrying a whip.
 

18' QCC 700X&&http://www.active.com/donate/paddle2battle&&Paddling to battle cancer one stroke at a time
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Reply #7 - 01/23/12 at 22:38:31

Los Humungos   Offline
2X MR340 Veteran
Sometimes wears a Wally
Werderich costume

Posts: 1365
**
 
On balance.  Balance in your boat is very important if you want your boat to perform to its maximum efficiency.  Over the period of time you are paddling in the 340, even a fraction of a percentage of a loss of efficiency adds up. When you are outfitting your canoe, mark a couple of straight lines at the 3 inch line and the 4 inch line on the bow and stern of your canoe.  Then as Paddle Up stated, put your equipment (especially your water) in the boat accordingly to balance the canoe.  Use the bow and stern lines to balance the canoe accordingly.  Thus, if you balance the canoe, no problem if your bow paddler is heavier.

When tackling the race, just keep moving.  Stay on the river even when it is tough.  If it gets down to the point where you want to quit, before you pull the plug on your effort, stop, get something to eat, and stretch out.  If you have the time, even take a break and rest/ sleep a little bit before you make your final decision.  Sometimes just a bit of food, sleep, or even a change of clothes will make you feel much better, refresh your mind, and allow you to make the best decision on whether you should continue.

In terms motivation for your partner, just make sure that you are bigger than your partner.  If your partner falters, threaten to kick their tail.  If they fail, wail on them with your paddle.  It makes it easier if you are the larger person.  Smiley  

Nah, seriously, just having fun and keeping it light has worked well for us.   

Hut,
Wally
LHP

   
 

Sometimes when you are man, you wear stretchy pants...its for fun... -Nacho   
You do not get guns like these from riding a bike. -Matt Strieb
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Reply #8 - 01/24/12 at 10:41:50

WAIMANU   Offline
5X MR340 Veteran

Posts: 1075
*****
 
Hmmm  ...lets just do a quick recall at this point  ...so far we have disagreed about boat number, then there was the team name and should the dbl blade be feathered or not, type of recovery drink,amount of training time required, amount of time on weights and apparatus vs onwater, how many days required to drive to KC and back, should the GPS unit be yellow or grey (one of each settles that), are we doing a hotel stop-over in Washington, may I stop for a half hour at Jeff City and visit with our biggest supporter there, should I wear a ball cap instead of my big non-aerodynamic, well worn ,sun protective and long time favourite Tilley, will our team captain (wife and mother) have final say on any ongoing "discussion" at the next meet point, and why can't I just pee into the boat when required (which will be extremely frequent if I consume water at the rate she does); afterall there are several  bulkheads between us!!!

At this point I think everything is under control and going very well!! Smiley Smiley Wink Wink Cool Cool

Oh yeah, then there was the topic of single ply or dbl ply!!!! Roll Eyes Roll Eyes    ...can't wait to get on the water  ...perhaps we shall fly a pennant, a red one, from a stern mast to worn others when to give us wide berth!

Bill / Waimanu
 
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Reply #9 - 01/24/12 at 10:54:59

WAIMANU   Offline
5X MR340 Veteran

Posts: 1075
*****
 
Actually if you notice all the smileys above, you can't help but see, that team "Carp Dýum" is very much in sync and in balance!
...until we see each other again Smiley Wink

B/W
 
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Reply #10 - 01/24/12 at 13:19:52

gus   Offline
3X MR340 Veteran
Race Volunteer
Gritty Fitty Veteran
Kawnivore Veteran

Posts: 348
***
 
I have done the race twice in a tandem canoe.   Both times with different people.   I think the biggest thing is to have fun and by all means, work as a team.   No one should ever be in charge of making all the decisions.  And also, always check to make sure the other is doing ok.   Make sure you check each other to make sure  you are both drinking and eating enough.  (trust me on this one,  I about died the first year.   Just paddled for 24 hours straight and did not eat or drink much).   In hind sight, my paddling partner that year said he noticed it but did not mention anything.  Bad idea.

Also, paddling at night may sound a bit scarey, but it is the best time to make some good miles while the temps are down and the wind really seems to calm after the sun sets.    Last time, we had some the best paddling at night.   Got a lot of miles in.  Although, most likely on night 2 you will be in a very small group or by yourself.   The first night, you should be able to buddy up with a group of paddlers.

Just my two cents worth.

Gus
 
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Reply #11 - 01/24/12 at 20:30:32

Steve J   Offline
2X MR340 Veteran

Posts: 29
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I think the most important thing is for you and your partner to have a very specific goal and then to do your part to make sure it happens so you don't let your partner down.  There will be times in the race when your partner is hurting and you are doing more of the work and times when you are hurting and your partner may be working harder, but don't sweat it, just keep paddling.  The first year we finished 7 hours after our 50 hour goal but we had both pushed ourselves to the brink, so no hard feelings.  The second year with learnings from year one we met our goal.  Felt like a great team accomplishment.  It also helps to find a partner as competitive, stubborn, willing to endure exteme pain, etc.... as yourself.
 
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